Armoured Cable


Armoured Cable

Armoured Cable is a hard-wearing power cable designed for the supply of mains electricity. It is one of a number of armoured electrical cables – which include 11kV Cable and 33kV Cable – and is found in underground systems, power networks and cable ducting.The use of the armour as the means of providing earthing to the equipment supplied by the cable (a function technically known as the circuit protective conductor or CPC) is a matter of debate within the electrical installation industry.




Flexible Cable


Flexible Cable

All electrical cables are somewhat flexible, allowing them to be shipped to installation sites wound on reels or drums. Where applications require a cable to be moved repeatedly, such as for portable equipment, more flexible cables called "cords" or "flex" are used. Flexible cords contain fine stranded conductors, not solid core conductors, and have insulation and sheaths to withstand the forces of repeated flexing and abrasion.

Heavy duty flexible power cords such as those feeding a mine face cutting machine are carefully engineered — their life is measured in weeks. Very flexible power cables are used in automated machinery, robotics, and machine tools. See power cord and extension cable for further description of flexible power cables. Other types of flexible cable include twisted pair, extensible, coaxial, shielded, and communication cable.




Instrumentation Cable


Instrumentation Cable

Instrumentation cables are wires that allow for a signal to be put into one end and give the same signal at the other end without distortion. What that means is if the instrument has a resisitive sensing element the 'instrument cable' used would have a very low resistive value and protection from enviromential influence to the cable to not change the value. Instrumentation cable may also be used for powering a device - which once again if powered via regulated voltage you'll want to make sure the voltage given at one end is the same on the other end. Instrumentation cables are also used for high frequency measurements are made. These instrument cables will have a frequency limitation typically based on the length of cable used due to its capacitance.




Signaling Cable


Signaling Cable

The common method to wire shielded cables is to ground only the source end of the shield to avoid ground loops. However, in airplanes special cable is used with both an outer shield to protect for lightning and an inner shield grounded at one end to eliminate hum from the 400 Hz power system.








Fiber Optics Cable


Fiber Optics Cable

Optical fiber can be used as a medium for telecommunication and computer networking because it is flexible and can be bundled as cables. It is especially advantageous for long-distance communications, because light propagates through the fiber with little attenuation compared to electrical cables. This allows long distances to be spanned with few repeaters.Fibers have many uses in remote sensing. In some applications, the sensor is itself an optical fiber. In other cases, fiber is used to connect a non-fiberoptic sensor to a measurement system. Depending on the application, fiber may be used because of its small size, or the fact that no electrical power is needed at the remote location, or because many sensors can be multiplexed along the length of a fiber by using different wavelengths of light for each sensor, or by sensing the time delay as light passes along the fiber through each sensor. Time delay can be determined using a device such as an optical time-domain reflectometer.




Coaxial Cable


Coaxial Cable

Coaxial Cable is a type of cable that has an inner conductor surrounded by a tubular insulating layer, surrounded by a tubular conducting shield. Many coaxial cables also have an insulating outer sheath or jacket. The term coaxial comes from the inner conductor and the outer shield sharing a geometric axis. Coaxial cable differs from other shielded cable used for carrying lower-frequency signals, such as audio signals, in that the dimensions of the cable are controlled to give a precise, constant conductor spacing, which is needed for it to function efficiently as a radio frequency transmission line.




Multi Core Cable


Multi Core Cable

A multicore cable is a generic term for an electrical cable that has multiple cores made of copper wire. The term is normally only used in relation to a cable that has more cores than commonly encountered. For example, a four core mains cable is never referred to as multicore, but a cable comprising four coaxial cables in a single sheath would be considered multicore.Multicore cables are used with professional video cameras. In television studios, 26-pin cables are used to connect "cameras" to camera control units (CCU). Triaxial cables are used primarily in outside broadcasting however both are capable of delivering an HD-SDI feed and 30 - 40 Watts of power for the Cameras.Many different kinds of multicore cable can be found in the list of video connectors.




Network Cable


Network Cable

Networking cables are used to connect one network device to other network devices or to connect two or more computers to share printer, scanner etc. Different types of network cables like Coaxial cable, Optical fiber cable, Twisted Pair cables are used depending on the network's topology, protocol and size. The devices can be separated by a few meters (e.g. via Ethernet) or nearly unlimited distances (e.g. via the interconnections of the Internet).Twisted pair cabling is a form of wiring in which pairs of wires (the forward and return conductors of a single circuit) are twisted together for the purposes of canceling out electromagnetic interference (EMI) from other wire pairs and from external sources. This type of cable is used for home and corporate Ethernet networks.An optical fiber cable consists of a center glass core surrounded by several layers of protective material. The outer insulating jacket is made of Teflon or PVC to prevent interference.








Telephone Cable


Telephone Cable

A telephone line or telephone circuit (or just line or circuit within the industry) is a single-user circuit on a telephone communication system. This is the physical wire or other signaling medium connecting the user's telephone apparatus to the telecommunications network, and usually also implies a single telephone number for billing purposes reserved for that user. Telephone lines are used to deliver landline telephone service and Digital subscriber line (DSL) internet service to the premise. Telephone lines are connected to the public switched telephone network.






VDI Structured Cabling


VDI Structured Cabling

Structured cabling is building or campus telecommunications cabling infrastructure that consists of a number of standardized smaller elements (hence structured) called subsystems.Structured cabling design and installation is governed by a set of standards that specify wiring data centers, offices, and apartment buildings for data or voice communications using various kinds of cable, most commonly category 5e (CAT-5e), category 6 (CAT-6), and fiber optic cabling and modular connectors. These standards define how to lay the cabling in various topologies in order to meet the needs of the customer, typically using a central patch panel (which is normally 19 inch rack-mounted), from where each modular connection can be used as needed. Each outlet is then patched into a network switch (normally also rack-mounted) for network use or into an IP or PBX (private branch exchange) telephone system patch panel.




Cable Management and Accessories


Cable Management and Accessories

Cable management refers to the installation of equipment to secure cables for electrical services in a building. The term is used for products or workmanship. Cable management is important in information technology (IT), communications, and power distribution.Cable management both supports and contains cables during installation, and makes subsequent maintenance or changes to the cable system easier. Products such as cable trays, cable ladders, and cable baskets are used to support a cable through cabling routes.The IT industry needs data cables to be added, moved, or removed many times during the life of the installation. It is usual practice to install "fixed cables" between cabling closets or cabinets. These cables are contained in cable trays etc., and are terminated at each end onto patch panels in the communications cabinet or outlets at the desktop. The circuits are then interconnected to the final destination using patch cords.Cables can easily become tangled, making them difficult to work with, sometimes resulting in devices accidentally becoming unplugged as one attempts to move a cable. Such cases are known as "cable spaghetti".